Wednesday, 6 February 2019

The Cave On Charlestown Beach, Cornwall

Cave at Charlestown, Cornwall
Cave on Charlestown Beach
Yesterday's Post was about a walk along Charlestown beach in Cornwall, What I didn't mention was that there is a small cave in the cliffs - as per the photo above.
Inside cave at Charletown Beach, Cornwall
Inside Cave
On Sunday the floor of the cave - above photo - was running with water but still possible to go inside. inside.
Hole in roof of cave at Charlestown, Cornwall
Looking Upwards
This is the strange bit. If you look upwards there is a hole right through to the top of the cliffs. Now what is that for? There is an explanation - but it could well be a load of baloney! But here it is.

We go back to the days of smuggling. The smugglers would beach their boat and rush their contraband to the cave. There would be a rope dangling through the hole and this would be used by the smugglers associates to heave the goods to the top. They could then transfer the smuggled goods to a safe house - and the boat would  sail away before the customs men could take any action.

A bit fanciful perhaps!

The rocks and stones below are just because I quite like rocks and stones.
Stones and rocks on Charlestown Beach, Cornwall
Rocks & Stones, Charlestown Beach

8 comments:

  1. Nice story! I can believe it! Your coastline is full of smugglers tales! ;-)

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    1. Thank you Heather.Yes, lots of tales but never sure which ones are genuine when it comes to smuggling.

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  2. Wow, highly interesting to learn how smugglers went about using caves.

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    1. Many thanks for your comment. There are lots of tales about smugglers in Cornwall.

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  3. Nice story, probably true. I love rocks too. When my father was alive, if he found a unusual rock, he would always bring it too me. Nice memories.

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    1. I have rocks, pebbles and the like on a garden walk that I have collected over the years. Something interesting about rocks - perhaps the age. Many thanks.

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  4. Thank you Mike, I love stones too, and in the beach more.You have beautiful posts..Thank you very much....Julio Miranda-Pujadas...in the South of the world...

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    Replies
    1. Hello! Thank you for your comment and your kind words. Always something fascinating about stones and pebbles on a beach. Best wishes.

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