Monday, 23 September 2019

Charlestown, Cornwall With Sailing Ships In The Harbour


Tall ships at Charlestown, Cornwall

Prior to going on holiday I made a quick visit to Charlestown harbour. I had heard that there were several sailing ships in dock.

Sailing ships at Charlestown Harbour

I didn't have a lot of time but snapped a few photos as I walked.

Charlestown, Cornwall, tall sailing ships

There was a stall using the Poldark name to entice people to have a free taster of their various alcoholic drinks - over 18's only, of course. Some of the Poldark scenes were filmed here.

Poldark drinks Charlestown, Cornwall

From the harbour wall the masts of the sailing ships looked quite a muddle - but an interesting muddle!

Harbour at Charlestown, Cornwall

Again, looking from the harbour wall, this time over the small beach. The Charlestown Rowing Club were just returning

Rowing Club at Charlestown, Cornwall

One of the rowing boats was also on the harbourside. 

Rowing Boat at Charlestown, Cornwall

By the harbour was another stall selling items made from sea-glass and other treasures found on the beaches.

Charlestown Harbour stall

The cottages look down on the sailing ships from on high.

Charlestown Harbour, Cornwall sailing boats

And, to finish with, a few more sails. It's always interesting wandering around Charlestown Harbour.

Charlestown Harbour ship sails

Also see:
A Stroll Around Poldark's Charlestown Harbour, Cornwall - 12 Photos

4 comments:

  1. What a great place, I love harbours, boats & water so it's no wonder I like these photographs. The old wooden boats have such character, fibreglass just doesn't compare. I like the photo with the three (or is it four) dogs.

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    1. Thanks David. I like harbours, boats and water too - luckily can find many of these in Cornwall. Love the old, tall sailing ships. There is usually at least one in at Charlestown harbour - as used for filming scenes from Poldark.

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  2. Agree with you both that a harbor is a wonderful thing. I also love to hear the sounds of the masts and sheets in a breeze at night. This looks like a tight harbor so maneuvering in is probably tricky for a casual sailor. You’ve taken a wonderful collection of photos, Mike. Enchanting!

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  3. Thank you Ann. You are right about it being difficult to manoeuvre, and the timing has to be right to enter through the gate. The water from behind the gate is fed by a leat.

    We always seem to be visiting Charlestown!

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