Friday, 20 August 2021

Goss Moor Walk and Newquay Beaches


It was a grey, drizzly day and, after much discusion, we decided to go for a walk on Goss Moor*. Incredibly, at least for us, was that we had never been on the seven mile circular walk previously.

We found one of several starting points and parked our car. There was no one else about.

We found out that we were actually walking on what was originally the old A30 road. Okay, but to be honest, it was a bit boring as everything was the same and  there were no views. If you looked left or right you just saw shrubs and a few flowers as the above photo.

A train zoomed past near by, thus the railway crossing photo below. The train was on the Atlantic Coast line which runs from Par to Newquay - just about 21 miles.


We continued walking, but it was still drizzling with fine rain.

I guess though that the history of this stretch of the trail is interesting. It is thought that it was once an old Roman Road and could well have been a prehistoric track prior to that. In the 1700's it was also a Turnpike road - part of  the coaching route from Jamaica Inn on the Bodmin Moor, to the coaching Inn at Indian Queens. The Jamaica Inn will be familiar to Daphne du Maurier readers because of the book of the same name.

The rain got harder so we decided not to finish the trail. We'll have another try some other time, starting at a different point on the trail.
*See Goss Moor Multi-use Trail

MOVING ON:
Something, perhaps, more typical of Cornwall, a few photos of Newquay.


This is the small harbour at Newquay built initially to export china clay in 1875. Back then there was a railway line to the pier on the left of the photo below.


Next, the small beach at the harbour.


Of course there are many superior beaches in Newquay, at least ten. It's why so many visitors head for this area. It is often said that Newquay is England's surfing capital.


Three photos of different Newquay beaches.






MOVING ON AGAIN:
A while back I wrote a post The Green, Green Fields But With A Sting In The Tail. The sting has started as they are now building on the green fields.


Below are green fields next to the development. I wonder if these will also disappear in time.


It is, of course, necessary that people, especially young locals, can purchase affordable houses near to where they live. This isn't always possible in Cornwall because of inflated house prices due to outsiders purchasing them as second homes or for the holiday trade. Anyway, I won't ramble on!


I will mention though another development,  near to the one above, that will have 460 homes, 150 of which are described as 'affordable'. There will also be a hotel a pub and restaurant, shops and so on. I did a post on this a while back: Large New Development at Higher Trewhiddle, Cornwall Is On It's Way 

Thanks for visiting my blog, hope the sun will shine for you ~ Mike.

4 comments:

  1. You said at the outset of this walk it was boring but I found it interesting go see something away from the coast. The harbour scenes with boats are always enjoyable. The last few "green fields" photo's were very similar to the landscape in Lincolnshire.

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    Replies
    1. Hello David, I was disappointed with the walk but it would no doubt be a good cycle ride as it is nice and flat. We are promised some sunshine for the new week, so fingers crossed.

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  2. Hello Mike, I've had Goss Moor on my radar for a bike ride with the kids for a while, so interesting to see. I have many fond memories of playing in Newquay harbour - the brave kids used to jump from that standalone pier on a higher tide. Sometimes a seal would come and visit. There was a ramshackle cafe that had a Space Invaders arcade game in it. Fistral beach was always a favourite too. These new housing bombardments make me angry to be honest. They are not seeking to address the local housing problem - just greedy developers intent on maximum profit. Anyhow, I shan't rant either :0 Thanks for the tour and hope you have a wonderful week. Lulu x

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  3. Thanks Lulu. The part of the trail that we walked would be perfect for cycling - nice and flat and not many people about, at least not many on the part we walked.
    As for the big housing development near St. Austell there seems to have been no thought to traffic congestion. The roads get gummed up already ... I won't say any more!
    Have a happy week, I think we are promised some sunshine.

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